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Goat

Herds of goats clear away poison oak and other problem weeds on our steep watersheds, open spaces in parks, and in overgrown areas at the airport.

San Francisco adopted an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Ordinance in 1996. This Ordinance commits the City to minimize the use of pesticides and instead use methods that pose a lower risk to public and environmental health. This IPM program has radically changed the way our City staff manages pest insects, rodents, and weeds.

Herds of goats clear away poison oak and other problem weeds on our steep watersheds, open spaces in parks, and in overgrown areas at the airport. In San Francisco, IPM means regular monitoring to determine if and when treatments are needed, and employing biological, cultural, mechanical, physical, and educational tactics to prevent pests or keep their numbers down. We emphasize non-chemical control methods, but when pesticides are necessary, we have an approved list of reduced-risk chemicals to meet the need.

Our IPM Program applies to City and County owned property, including an international airport and port, hospitals, golf courses, jails, office buildings, City Hall, rights-of-way and watershed lands, buses and trains, landscaped parks, and natural areas. While each situation requires a unique approach, IPM provides a clear and effective framework that guides all pest management decisions.

San Francisco's IPM program is funded by us, the Recreation and Parks Department, the Department of Public Health, the Department of Public Works, the Municipal Transportation Agency, the Port of San Francisco, and San Francisco International Airport. The Commission on the Environment provides program direction and oversight.
Last updated: 12/3/2012 4:07:40 PM